Tag: cabernet sauvignon and food

Wine at Home

Herb Braised Short Ribs, Creamy Polenta, & 2018 Colton’s…

By Laina Carter of McGrail Vineyards & Winery

If you’ve ever had our Colton’s Cabernet, you know it’s special. One of the things that sets it apart from our other Cabs is that it’s an old-world-style Cabernet Sauvignon and the grapes used to produce this wine come from our Lucky 8 Vineyard. What’s unique about this property is there is a gargantuan eucalyptus tree on the adjacent property, which lends these grapes some serious herbal characteristics. Though the herbal notes came through like crazy in our first vintage of this Cab, each vintage following has been farmed more meticulously, which has reduced the amount of mint and eucalyptus we get from these grapes. Unlike our estate-grown Cabernets, Colton’s Cab is aged for just 18 months in oak, rather than the 30 months our Cab Reserve, Patriot, Good Life, and James Vincent spend in oak, resulting in a wine that is far less tannic and more approachable just prior to bottling. Lastly, the clone of Cabernet Sauvignon, clone 30, is slightly different from the clones 8 and 15 that are planted on our estate. Still, the 2018 vintage of Colton’s Cabernet is unexpectedly big, but is incredibly smooth, with some muted herbal hints, which is why this is perfect to pair with some her braised short ribs.

Herb Red Wine Braised Short Ribs and Creamy Polenta

Makes about 4 servings.

INGREDIENTS:

For the short ribs:

  • 3 lbs. bone-in beef short ribs
  • 2 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Pepper to taste
  • 1 large red onion
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. garlic, minced
  • 3 cups red wine
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary
  • 1 sprig fresh sagebrush
  • 1 sprig fresh mint
  • 2 bay laurel leaves
  • Optional: Extra sagebrush or rosemary sprigs to garnish

For the polenta:

  • 1/2 tsp. Kosher Salt
  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal or polenta
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 1/3 cup freshly grated parmesan
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • Pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

For the short ribs:

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Remove all racks from oven except for one and place it in the lower third of oven.
  2. Brush short rubs with oil and season generously with salt and pepper.
  3. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high. Add each short rib, leaving space between them. Sear each short rib, allowing them to really brown. Turn short ribs on each side, until all sides are browned, about fifteen minutes in total.
  4. Once short ribs have been seared, turn the heat to medium, add onion and garlic around short ribs, and cook until soft, about five minutes.
  5. Add red wine and bring to a simmer.
  6. Add herbs, cover, and place in oven. Braise short ribs in oven until meat is tender and falling off the bone, about two to two and a half hours.
  7. Allow meat to rest in covered pan for twenty minutes prior to serving.
  8. Rest the meat. When the meat is done, rest in a covered pan for 20 minutes before serving. Serve by gently tugging the chunks of meat away from the bone and spooning the saucy onions over top.
  9. Serve in a bowl or on plate with the creamy polenta, garnish with an extra herb sprig, and pair with our 2018 Colton’s Cabernet Sauvignon!

For the polenta:

  1. In a medium saucepan, bring salt and 4 cups water to a boil. Slowly and steadily add polenta or cornmeal, whisking constantly. Continue to whisk 2 minutes after all polenta has been added. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes, whisking occasionally. Remove from heat. Add butter, cheese, and one of the minced garlic cloves, then season with salt and pepper. Mix well.
  2. Serve in a bowl or on plate with the braised short ribs, garnish with an extra herb sprig, and pair with our 2018 Colton’s Cabernet Sauvignon!

I hope I’ve inspired you to grab your Dutch oven and make this tasty pairing at home! Please let us know if you do make these short ribs and if you have any feedback. We’d love to hear from you!

Cheers and enjoy!

Food and Wine Pairings

Fresh Heirloom Tomato Gnocchi and C. Tarantino Cabernet Sauvignon

By Laina Carter of McGrail Vineyards & Winery

There’s something so special about Italian food. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, I find it impossible to dislike Italian food. The ingredients are so, incredibly wholesome and versatile. Italian dishes are just plain comforting and delicious.

Vintage after vintage, our C. Tarantino Cabernet Sauvignon continues to be one of my absolute favorite wines we produce. I can always count on it being fruit-forward and drinkable as soon as it’s released. My favorite vintage was the 2013 and despite being so drinkable when it was released, this wine is aging beautifully. I’d say the 2017 vintage is quite similar to the 2013. Consistently, the C. Tarantino Cab has gorgeous acidity, which makes it the absolute perfect wine to pair with Italian dishes. I’m not sure if it’s the soil the grapes are grown in, if it’s the grape clone (337, which is different from what we have on our estate and our Lucky 8 Vineyard), or if it’s even the way the sun hits the vines in the summertime, but something about this wine is simply magical.

If you were lucky enough to receive this fabulous wine in your most recent club shipment, whip it out and try this pairing for yourself. We are a few bottles shy of selling out of the 2017 vintage of this Cab, so if you want to try this pairing, don’t wait. Get a bottle now. I promise you won’t be disappointed by this pairing!

Heirloom Tomato, Fresh Basil, and Mozzarella Potato Gnocchi Paired with our 2017 C. Tarantino Cabernet Sauvignon

Makes about 6 servings

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. fresh garlic, minced
  • 2 lbs. whole mini heirloom tomatoes
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 lbs. shelf-stable potato gnocchi, cooked according to package directions
  • 3/4 cup fresh basil
  • 1 cup roasted garlic marinara sauce
  • 8 oz. ciliegine mozzarella balls, cut into quarters
  • Grated pecorino romano and parmesan blend cheese 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a 12-inch cast iron skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. 
  2. Add the garlic to the skillet. Cook until slightly browned. 
  3. Add mini heirloom tomatoes.
  4. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Prepare the potato gnocchi according to package directions.
  6. Cook garlic and tomatoes in skillet for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occasionally, until tomatoes begin to soften.
  7. Add the gnocchi to the skillet. Cook until heated through.
  8. Stir in ½ cup of the fresh basil and the marinara sauce.
  9. Add the mozzarella. Stir until it just begins to melt.
  10. Plate the gnocchi and sprinkle the pecorino romano and parmesan cheese blend over each plate. Garnish with remaining basil.
  11. Enjoy this delicious dish with a glass or two of our 2017 C. Tarantino Cabernet Sauvignon!

Please let us know if you end up making this pairing and if you have any feedback! We’d love to hear it.

Cheers and enjoy!

Wine at Home

Cast-Iron Skillet Chimichurri Rib Eye and “The Good Life”…

By Laina Carter of McGrail Vineyards & Winery

Have you ever tried something that is so extraordinarily flavorful that you just can’t get enough of it? This is how I feel about McGrail wine… and chimichurri sauce. Accordingly, this pairing has a TON of flavor.

What Is Chimichurri?

Wondering what the heck chimichurri is? Basically, it’s an herb-based sauce made primarily using raw or uncooked ingredients. It can be red (chimichurri rojo) or green (chimichurrri verde), depending on what kind of herbs are used. It pretty much always contains garlic, parsley, oregano, and vinegar, but there are countless variations of this scrumptious sauce.

No one seems to be totally sure about chimichurri’s origin. Some believe it derived from the Basque region’s “tximitxurri” sauce, as the pronunciations are very similar, though the ingredients are not. Others think it was loosely based off of Sicily’s salmoriglio sauce, as both typically contain parsley, oregano, and garlic. Since the English always seemed to stick their head in everyone’s business back in the day, there are some people who insist it was called “Jimmy’s curry,” “Jimmy Curry,” or even “Jimmy McCurry,” after an English lad who joined in the fight for Argentina’s independence, and some who believe it was the result of an English prisoner asking for condiments to season his meat, after England’s attempt to invade Argentina failed. There are many myths as to where chimichurri sauce came from exactly, but at this point in its history, it is most commonly found in Argentine or Uruguayan cuisine.

A Jó Élet, “The Good Life”

“A jó élet” is a Hungarian phrase, which roughly translates to “the good life” in English. This bottle of estate-grown Cabernet Sauvignon is aged for nearly 30 months in 100% brand new Hungarian oak barrels. These barrels are sourced from two different coopers, both of whom use tight grain oak from the Zempelén Forest. This wine demonstrates a classic Cabernet Sauvignon bouquet of dark cherry, cassis, and vanilla, but also offers the notes of baking spice and bold tannins that you would expect from a wine that has been aged for over two years in brand new Hungarian oak. The Good Life is rich and full-bodied with notes of leather, herbs, and white pepper, which makes this the perfect wine to pair with a chimichurri rib eye steak. When you pair this wine with this dish, there is no doubt you’re living the good life.

I hope you’re excited to try this recipe at home, because I seriously can’t wait to make this pairing again! This is probably my favorite food and wine pairing so far.

Cast-Iron Skillet Chimichurri Rib Eye with Fingerling Potatoes & Crimini Mushrooms Paired with 2016 A Jó Élet, “The Good Life,” Cabernet Sauvignon

Makes about 4 servings.

INGREDIENTS:

For the marinade:

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/3 cup fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 3 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1 ½ tbsp. minced garlic 
  • 2 lbs. rib eye steak (2 thick cuts of meat)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

For the chimichurri sauce:

  • 1 cup fresh parsley, stems removed, packed
  • 1 cup fresh cilantro, stems removed, packed
  • 1 tbsp. fresh oregano, stems removed, packed
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ½ medium onion, diced
  • 1 tbsp. garlic
  • 2 tbsp. fresh lime juice
  • 2 tbsp. orange juice
  • 2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ tsp. cumin
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper

For the sides:

  • 2 small shallots, halved
  • 6 whole garlic cloves
  • 10 oz. sliced crimini mushrooms
  • 1 lb. golden fingerling potatoes
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • Optional: fresh sprigs of rosemary and/or thyme

DIRECTIONS:

To marinate and season the rib eye:

  1. In a medium-sized bowl, whisk all rib eye marinade ingredients together, except for the salt, pepper, and rib eye. 
  2. Place the rib eye in a gallon-sized ziploc bag and add the marinade to the bag. Make sure the meat is completely covered by the marinade and place in the refrigerator for 3-6 hours, depending on how thick the meat is (longer if the meat is thicker).
  3. When ready to place the rib eye in the skillet, liberally season it with salt and pepper.

To make the chimichurri sauce:

  1. In a food processor, add all chimichurri sauce ingredients and blend until smooth. Set aside.
  2. Store chimichurri sauce leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator. It will last several days without browning.

To prepare the sides:

  1. In a large pot, bring 4 quarts of well-salted water to a boil.
  2. Add the fingerling potatoes and boil until soft, about 15 minutes.
  3. Strain the potatoes and set aside.

To cook the rib eye and sides:

  1. In a 12-inch cast-iron skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat.
  2. Add garlic cloves and halved shallots. Cook until slightly browned.
  3. Add sliced crimini mushrooms. Cook mushrooms with the garlic and shallots, stirring occasionally, until they become soft. 
  4. Using a spatula, move the mushrooms, garlic, and shallots to one side of the pan. Add the rib eye steaks and about half of the marinade in the ziploc bag. Add the fingerling potatoes over the mushrooms, garlic, and shallots, and stir, so they are evenly covered in marinade. Add the optional sprigs of rosemary or thyme.
  5. For medium-rare steak, cook the steaks for about six minutes on each side, flipping after about three minutes (twelve minutes total, four intervals of three minutes). Add about 3-5 minutes to total cooking time if you like your meat well done.

To serve:

  1. Once cooked to desired done-ness, plate the steaks and vegetables. Spoon the chimichurri sauce over the steaks.
  2. Enjoy this flavorful plate with a glass of our 2016 A Jó Élet “The Good Life” Cabernet Sauvignon!

Please let us know if you end up making this pairing and if you have any feedback! We’d love to hear it.

Cheers and enjoy!